Health and Digital Medicine

Key Takeaways

  • A recent study of 9,000 successful investors in their early 60s found that health concerns accounted for five of their top seven major worries.
  • Thanks to advances in nutrition, health and medical technology, 100 is the new 60—with some caveats.
  • Five important digital changes are having a profound impact on longevity: smart wearables, personal genetic services, remote diagnostics, smart home health sensors and 3-D printed implants.

***Remember our Spring Cleaning Barbecue May 16 from 10am to 2pm. Shred old documents; donate used electronics.

Vanguard recently surveyed 9,000 successful investors who were in their early 60s. Of the seven major personal concerns they had, five were related to health. With advances in health, nutrition and medical technology, many folks have reason to believe they can live very good lives all the way out to age 100. Some say 100 is the new 60.

Being proactive about maintaining good health is part of the equation, and I wanted to bring five important digital advances to your attention.

  1. Smart wearables. Apple just came out with a smartwatch, and Fitbit’s had one for a while. Wearables can give you lots of diagnostic information about your nutrition, exercise, sleeping patterns and more. They’re fascinating, and I’ve seen people achieve really positive results with these devices.
  2. Personal genetic services. The first genome study was completed in 2001, for $100 million. Now you can get your own genome study done for about $1,000. You may not want to know if you have a cancer gene or some other potential illness lurking within you. Then again, you may find it helpful to know that you need to be wary of (and tested for) certain potential illnesses later in life.
  3. Remote diagnostics. This is when someone who’s in a different room or in a different building—or even on a different continent—does a personal diagnosis of you. On the International Space Station recently, a nonmedical person was able to conduct a cardiac ultrasound in space with the remote assistance of a radiologist here on Earth.
  4. Smart home health sensors. We have video, motion sensors, automatic timers and wearables for seniors who are at home—this is all about enabling seniors to stay in their homes, remain independent for as long as possible and not have to go into a nursing home or other kind of facility.
  5. 3-D printed implants. In two years, we’re going to be able to use 3-D printing technology to produce artificial bladders for people who have bad bladders. We’ve already used this technology to produce artificial ears, arteries and other parts of the body for replacement. It’s all coming sooner than you think.

Speaking of the future, our Spring Cleaning Barbecue will be held in our parking lot on May 16 from 10am to 2pm. It’s being co-hosted with Weiss & Company, a CPA firm across the hall from us. We’ll have free paper shredding for you, electronics recycling and a place to donate other items to Goodwill. We’ll also have a barbecue truck and live music. We’d love to see you.

Until next time, enjoy. Gary

www.coylefinancial.com
800-480-7913 | coyle@coylefinancial.com

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